They Said It... From John Stossel, Walter Williams, and More - The Advocates for Self-Government
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They Said It… From John Stossel, Walter Williams, and More

(From the They Said It section in Volume 19, No. 24 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

HOW ABOUT NUCLEAR-POWERED CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES: “If they could have a nuclear-powered tank that could fly itself to the battlefield, they’d want one. They’d have a 38-page requirement to buy a chocolate-chip cookie. . . . No one is held accountable.” — retired Marine Corps major general Arnold Punaro, now chair of a National Defense Industrial Association board struggling to get billions of dollars of wasteful Pentagon spending under some control. (Good luck with that one…)

NEVER MIND WHAT THAT JESUS GUY SAID:
John Stossel“In Fort Lauderdale, Florida, police charged two pastors and a 90-year-old volunteer with giving food to poor people in public. Florida law declares it illegal to give away food in an outdoor location without providing public toilets. The restrictions were instated in the name of ‘public health and safety.’ In New Jersey, churches were forced to stop offering Thanksgiving dinners to poor people because they didn’t have ‘properly licensed commercial kitchens.'” — John Stossel, “Control Freaks,” syndicated column, Nov. 19, 2014.

UBER SAFER THAN TAXIS: “Uber remains one of the safest, if not the safest, ways to order a car. … First of all, drivers are given criminal background checks in the same way that normal taxi drivers are. … But the average Uber ride — with its GPS monitoring, cashless payments, real identity recording, and pre-booking — generates more information about who is in the car, and is therefore likely to be generally safer than a normal taxi.” — journalist James Cook, “Despite the Scary Rape Headlines, Uber Is Probably Still the Safest Way to Order a Taxi,” Business Insider, Dec. 8, 2014.

Walter Williams

A LAWLESS COUNTRY: “Let’s look at our country and ask whether we live under rule of law. Just about every law that Congress enacts violates the requirements for rule of law. How do we determine violations of rule of law? It’s easy. See whether the law applies to particular Americans, as opposed to all Americans. See whether the law exempts public officials from its application. See whether the law is known in advance. See whether the law takes action against a person who has taken no aggressive action against another. If one conducts such a test, he will conclude that it is virtually impossible to find a single act of Congress that adheres to the principles of the rule of law.” — Walter Williams, “What’s Rule of Law?”, syndicated column, Dec. 10, 2014.

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