Liberty on the Ballot
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Liberty on the Ballot

War and politics make strange bedfellows but sometimes they even manage to pit friend against friend. Sometimes, trying to advance the same cause can sometimes pit you against former allies who believe they are advancing the same effort as you, which tends to make things a tad complicated.

In my five years as political operative staffing, running, and consulting for various candidates throughout the country ranging from city council to Senate candidates, what I can confirm for you is that in everyone’s mind, they assume that they are right and you are wrong – it’s that simple. Within the libertarian (small L) community, the same problems still apply.

Partisan politics and tense primaries always put our egos on full display. As a libertarian voter, doesn’t it make sense to vote for the Libertarian candidate?

At face value it makes sense but in reality, sometimes you have to look between the eyes. What if a Libertarian (big L) candidate advocates for gun control and a universal basic income?

Does that make him more or less libertarian-minded than let’s say a pro-gun, anti-tax Republican? This ethical issue can become very complicated because politics at its core is a complicated arena where good intentions go to die and discomfort comes to play.

Primaries can sometimes be worst however because the choices can be even slimmer.

What do you do in a Democrat or Republican primary when you want to choose the candidate you align with the most, but you know that person can’t win a general election and the more compromising candidate can? At least with the latter, you’ll have a seat at the table, right?

The issue with elections is the issue with life itself, sometimes we don’t get clear cut choices, sometimes we just get the hand of cards we’re dealt.

The choice you make at the ballot will be between you and the ballot. You have to be the one to define your principles, understand the mindsets of those running, and then justify the outcome, good or bad, as the results become reality.

Ultimately for liberty to thrive in our lifetime, we have to engage in the world around us, live out the principles we espouse, and not destroy the lives or reputations of others because of a difference of political opinion no matter how big or small that decision might be.

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