stagnation

Home » stagnation

Be Effective More Than Efficient

in Liberator Online by Brett Bittner Comments are off

Be Effective More Than Efficient

This article was featured in our weekly newsletter, the Liberator Online. To receive it in your inbox, sign up here.

I love efficiency. I like to see people work to make things better, faster, and more appealing.

Innovation is exciting!

Where I get lost is when their fascination with making something easier paralyzes them to the point of stagnation. They will spend more time working to find a better, faster, or easier solution than it would take to just do the work of the existing options.

We are most effective when we work to persuade at the one-on-one level. When having individual conversations, we:

  • Are able to see body language and interpret those cues
  • Get to hear non-verbal auditory cues, like tone, as we listen attentively
  • Display a passion for Liberty 
  • Get immediate feedback on our efforts

While these conversations are not particularly easy, especially at first, they are effective.

efficientAs someone who is rather technologically adept, while also appreciating innovation, I understand the desire to automate and digitize things. The key for us is to balance the “old” and “new,” as we reach different audiences, who have different preferences.

Many “old ways” involve a bit of a personalized attention, like hand-written letters and notes, a telephone call, or following up with a thank you. While we may find e-mail blasts, mass texting, and smartphone apps more efficient for us to broadcast a message, keep in mind that those methods aren’t as effective as actual person-to-person interaction. They also will not reach everyone, even those you target with your message. We all find a reason to archive or delete an e-mail, ignore a text, and turn off the notifications for an app.

As those looking to persuade work to develop the “next big thing,” keep in mind that the time you spend on innovation is time not spent being a shining example of libertarianism, living a libertarian lifestyle, or having those conversations. By seeking to “reinvent the wheel,” many forsake the tried and true methods, rather than working on getting their message out and lose valuable time.

This compounds when we assume one “touch” carries the same weight as another. An in-person conversation holds more value than receiving an e-mail blast. A personal phone call outweighs a direct mail piece. A handwritten thank you note shows you care more than an automated response e-mail.

None of that should be taken to mean that we shouldn’t utilize some of the more innovative, efficient methods of communicating Liberty. Rather, we should incorporate them as part of a comprehensive strategy to be as effective as possible, rather than focusing on just the most efficient, and often less effective, modes.

They Said It… Elizabeth Nolan Brown, Conor Friedersdorf, And More!

in Communicating Liberty by James W. Harris Comments are off

(From the They Said It section in Volume 19, No. 13 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

Conor Friedersdorf

LIBERTARIAN VICTORIES: “If fewer people are caged for inhaling the smoke of a plant, that’s a libertarian victory. If fewer people’s doors are kicked in late at night by police officers dressed in combat fatigues, that’s a libertarian victory. If more cancer patients can legally obtain a substance that alleviates their suffering, that’s a libertarian victory. If fewer assets are seized by police without proof of guilt, that’s a libertarian victory.” — Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic, “Libertarians Can Be a Significant Force for Good in U.S. Politics,” refuting critics who charge that libertarianism is not changing U.S. politics.
REFUTING THE LATEST PROGRESSIVE LIE ABOUT LIBERTARIANS:

Elizabeth Nolan Brown“There seems to be a meme going around that libertarians don’t care or aren’t talking about what’s going on in Ferguson, Missouri. And like most things mainstream left/right pundits say about libertarians, it has almost zero relation to the truth. … If you don’t think libertarians are talking about (and outraged over) Ferguson, you’re clearly not reading or talking to many libertarians.” — Elizabeth Nolan Brown, “Where Are the Libertarians on Ferguson? Here, LMGTFY,” The Dish, Aug. 14 2014. Her article provides many examples of libertarian activists and organizations fighting against police militarization now and in the past.

DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY BY… BLEEDING: “Police in Ferguson, Missouri, once charged a man with destruction of property for bleeding on their uniforms while four of them allegedly beat him.” — Michael Daly, “The Day Ferguson Cops Were Caught in a Bloody Lie,” The Daily Beast, Aug. 15, 2014.

OBAMA VS. FREEDOM OF THE PRESS: “He [Obama] is the greatest enemy Jim Risento press freedom in a generation.” — Jim Risen, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist facing imprisonment for his investigation of the Bush-Obama surveillance state, quoted in “Where’s the Justice at Justice?”, New York Times,  Aug. 17, 2014.


OBAMA AS BIG BROTHER: 

Maureen Dowd“Obama is channeling Orwell.” — Maureen Dowd, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist, protesting Obama’s crackdown on freedom of the press and other invasive policies in “Where’s the Justice at Justice?”, New York Times, Aug. 17, 2014.

OOPS: “The U.S. Postal service has lost $2 billion this Conan O'Brienspring. Postal officials are busy emailing each other wondering how this could happen.” — Conan O’Brien, Aug. 11, 2014.
Noted and Re-Quoted
GOV’T FAILURE:

Matt Ridley“Economists are quick to speak of ‘market failure,’ and rightly so, but a greater threat comes from ‘government failure’. Because it is a monopoly, government brings inefficiency and stagnation to most things it runs; government agencies pursue the inflation of their budgets rather than the service of their customers; pressure groups form an unholy alliance with agencies to extract more money from taxpayers for their members. Yet despite all this, most clever people still call for government to run more things and assume that if it did so, it would somehow be more perfect, more selfless, next time.” — Matt Ridley from his 2010 book The Rational Optimist. Quoted by Don Boudreaux at Café Hayek, August 14, 2014.