What Nicolas Cage Taught Me About Liberty

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I’ll admit it: a Nicolas Cage film had a hand in inspiring me to take part in the Liberty movement.

LibertyIn the 2004 Disney film National Treasure, Cage plays Benjamin Gates, a man who is determined to clear his family name in the academic community for believing that treasure was hidden by Free Masons during the American Revolution.

Generations of the Gates family spent their lives chasing clues around the world only to be left defeated. Ben is the first in generations to make a major discovery towards the treasure of the Free Masons, which leads him to his next major clue: a map on the back of the Declaration of Independence.

 While discussing next steps with his team, Gates reminds them that one line is truly the heart of the Declaration:

 “But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and provide new Guards for their future security.”

It means that if there is something wrong with the way our government is being run, it is up to those who can to take action or otherwise make a change as they see fit—much like the action our Founding Fathers took by declaring independence from Britain.

 More than 240 years since the Declaration of Independence was signed, the heart of it should be a constant reminder of the ideals of Liberty.

If one’s community, state, or country isn’t being run as it should, then who is stepping up to the plate to enact change, run for office, or organize concerned citizens to make said changes?

Liberty is not just a vocabulary word in a history textbook. Having active participants in the Liberty movement is crucial. Without them, the next generation won’t be inspired to do what is right in the name of freedom.

What have you done for Liberty today?

 

in Freedom On Campus, Liberator Online, Libertarianism by Chloe Anagnos Comments are off