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Big Government vs. Self-Government in Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’

in Communicating Liberty, Liberator Online, Marriage and Family by Morgan Dean Comments are off

Big Government vs. Self-Government in Shakespeare’s As You Like It

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William Shakespeare’s comedy As You Like It is known for the themes of marriage, forgiveness and love. However, upon closer examination, it can also be read as a tale of people fighting the wrongs of Big Government, while pursuing self-government.

as you like itFirst, we have to look at what it means to “self-govern.” We give this our own meaning every day when we make decisions independent from the government. Self-Governing means that you decide how to live and are responsible for your own actions and choices.

In As You Like It, there are two opposing sides in a warring family, Duke Senior, who represents self-government and peace, and the other being Duke Frederick who represents Big Government and violence.

The major motif within the play is a family divided. Duke Senior has been usurped by his brother and banished from the kingdom, while Duke Frederick remains and banishes other members of Duke Senior’s family.

Duke Senior flees to The Forest of Arden where he lives a very minimalist life, among the shepherds who live very pastoral lives. The forest serves as a place of freedom and refuge from the evils of courtly life. The idea of the forest in literature, and especially in this play, is that it is the antithesis of civilization. The forest is the one place that man has not yet touched and made corrupt.

Living in the forest, Duke Senior builds a life for himself, finds other lords who have also left the court, and pursues a freedom in the forest. They operate completely separately from the Big Government that is back at the court, and they are happy.

As we are well aware, Big Government always tries to intervene. Rare contributor Bonnie Kristian wrote an interesting article about how even the smallest examples of government interference should concern us.

Even during Shakespeare’s time, there is government overreach. Duke Frederick and his posse go after Duke Senior. However, along the way he meets a priest who convinces him to lead a peace-loving life away from the court. Self-government, for the win!

If self-government worked in the Shakespearean era, with practice, it can work today, several hundred years later.

Most importantly, are you putting self-government into practice in your daily life?

Why Not Apologize?

in Communicating Liberty, Liberator Online by Michael Cloud Comments are off

(From the Persuasion PowerPoint section in Volume 19, No. 14 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

Have you ever put your foot in your mouth?Questioning

Have you ever said something and wish you had bitten your tongue?

Have you ever exploded on someone for no good reason?

I have.

Probably you have, too.

Maybe you were abrasive.

Maybe you were self-righteous.

Maybe you were argumentative.

Maybe you simply forgot to put yourself in the other person’s shoes.

What do you do when you mess up?

What do you do when you rub someone the wrong way?

Why not apologize?

Admit that you’re human. That you needlessly hurt their feelings. That you needlessly embarrassed or shamed them.

Apologizing well is an art.

By “apologizing well” I mean apologizing in such a way that the other person knows that you ARE sorry. That you do regret what you’ve done. That you want to clear the air and make it right.

That you want their forgiveness and another chance.

If you are sorry, tell the person exactly what you did wrong. Tell the person that you are sorry for what you’ve done to them.

And ask them to forgive you.

Whether you’re working out conflict with co-workers, or debating small government vs. Big Government, it’s easy to get caught up in “being right.”

It’s easy to needlessly hurt the feelings of the other person, or step on their toes.

When you do, immediately admit your blunder. Immediately apologize.

Not some vague, abstract, “If I might have done anything that might have been misunderstood …” phony apology.

A real one.

One you mean.

People are enormously forgiving when you admit your sin, say you’re sorry, and try to make it right.

They give you another chance, a clean slate.

If you’re like me, you’ll mess up, hurt people’s feelings, and feel very bad about it.

If you want to start fresh, and mend fences, why not apologize?

Persuasion is about building bridges, not walls.

Read the next article from this issue here.

Go back to the full issue here.

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Unlocking More Secrets of Libertarian PersuasionMichael Cloud’s latest book Unlocking More Secrets of Libertarian Persuasion is available exclusively from the Advocates, along with his acclaimed earlier book Secrets of Libertarian Persuasion.

In 2000, Michael was honored with the Thomas Paine Award as the Most Persuasive Libertarian Communicator in America.