World’s Smallest Political Quiz

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“Rockin’ the Vote” — with the World’s Smallest Political Quiz

in Liberator Online Archives by Sharon Harris Comments are off

(From the President’s Corner section in Volume 19, No. 20 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

“Rockin’ the vote in Chadron” was the title of a November 11 news story in the Chadron Record newspaper of Chadron, Nebraska.

The story tells how high school teacher Craig Nobiling uses the Advocates’ World’s Smallest classroomPolitical Quiz and other innovative tools and teaching methods in his U.S. Government classes to “help students understand the political spectrum and clarify their own political thinking.”

Excerpt:

Using an online version of the ‘World’s Smallest Political Quiz,’ students get a feel for where their opinions on the broadest of issues may reside.

The Advocates for Self-Government, who created the Quiz and host it online today state, “The Quiz political map is based on the ‘Nolan Chart’ created in 1970 by David F. Nolan. In 1987 Advocates Founder Marshall Fritz created the World’s Smallest Political Quiz by adding ten questions to Nolan’s Chart, along with other refinements.”

The site goes on to state, “The Quiz challenges the dominant ‘Left versus Right’ political model. The Left versus Right model tries to categorize virtually all political opinion into either left and right. This model — still widely used today — is misleading and fatally flawed. It has no place for many millions of people who don’t fit neatly into some variant of liberal or conservative, left or right. In effect, it disenfranchises the tens of millions of Americans who don’t feel that ‘left,’ ‘right,’ ‘liberal,’ ‘conservative,’ etc. accurately describe their views.”

Teacher Nobiling stresses to his students the importance of keeping up with current events, learning the views of candidates, and understanding and exploring their own political views.

I love reading stories about dedicated and creative high school and college educators using the Advocates’ World’s Smallest Political Quiz in their classrooms. The acceptance of the Quiz as a valid educational tool is central to the mission of the Advocates. Among other things, the Quiz lets students know that there is more to politics than just left and right — that libertarianism is a vital and growing part of American politics.

The Quiz is used in classrooms across the country. We’ve shipped over 30,000 Quizzes to teachers who’ve requested paper copies.

Most teachers use the online Quiz, which has been described and recommended in more than two dozen textbooks (or their online resources) published by some of the world’s leading textbook companies.

Over the years educators have told us that the Quiz is wonderful for classroom use. It brings politics alive for students, and stimulates fantastic discussions.

Traveling around the country I’ve met more and more young people who, when encountering the Quiz, say: “Oh yes, I remember that from high school.”

And that’s great news for libertarians!

* * *

Educators: We are delighted to send you free Quiz cards for classroom use. Just email us about your classes and how many Quizzes you need.

Forbes Features Fascinating New Use of World’s Smallest Political Quiz

in Liberator Online Archives by Sharon Harris Comments are off

(From the President’s Corner section in Volume 19, No. 18 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

“Have You Significantly Changed Your Political Views Since Age 18? If So, How?”World's Smallest Political Quiz

That the title of a fascinating article at Forbes.com featuring the World’s Smallest Political Quiz.

In it, economist Michael F. Cannon describes his intellectual journey from Big Government “socially conservative social democrat” in high school to socially conservative/free market-oriented university student… and finally, a few years later, to where he is today: a full-fledged libertarian, solidly in favor of civil liberties, free markets, and a non-interventionist foreign policy.

Indeed, Cannon not only became a libertarian — he has become a remarkably influential one. He is director of health policy studies at the libertarian Cato Institute. Though not a Republican, he served as a domestic policy analyst for the U.S. Senate Republican Policy Committee, advising the Senate leadership on health, education, labor, welfare, and the Second Amendment. His work has been featured in many of America’s most influential newspapers and magazines, and he has appeared ABC, CBS, CNN, CNBC, C-SPAN, Fox News Channel and NPR.

To illustrate his personal ideological journey, Cannon uses… the World’s Smallest Political Quiz. He draws different Quiz scores on the Quiz to indicate how he would have scored at different times in his life, thus creating the striking visual map of his political awakening that I’ve reprinted in this column.

I’ve never seen this done before. But the Quiz is a perfect — and crystal-clear — way to document and illustrate this. Kudos to Cannon for thinking of this!

I know over the past few decades, as libertarian ideas have spread, many millions of people have made intellectual journeys very similar to Cannon’s. (And for millions of them, the Quiz itself has been an important part of their intellectual awakening.) Whether starting from the left or the right, more and more Americans are finding themselves drawn to the logic, consistency and compassion of libertarianism.

Check Cannon’s article out — and consider using the Quiz to document and share the story of your own journey.

Is Liberty Doomed — or Inevitable?

in Communicating Liberty, Liberator Online Archives, Libertarianism by Sharon Harris Comments are off

(From the President’s Corner section in Volume 19, No. 15 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

I’ve heard both of these arguments for many years:

1.) “The libertarian cause is doomed. People will never understand liberty; even those who do understand it don’t want it. So why should I waste my time in such a futile cause?”

and:

2.) “Libertarianism is certain to succeed. The state cannot out-compete the marketplace. Given time, the superiority of the market will inevitably lead to a libertarian society. So why should I spend my time working on what will come about inevitably anyway?”

Ironically, both arguments lead many people to stop working for liberty, to stop supporting libertarian causes, to turn their back on the freedom movement.

I think both arguments are wrong.

I certainly believe that liberty is winning — in fact, our ideas are spreading at an incredible pace. I speak from experience. I’ve been in the libertarian movement since the early 1970s, when almost no one believed these ideas — when the joke used to be: “How many libertarians can fit into a phone booth? Answer: all of them.”

Today no one would even understand that joke. Libertarians are everywhere, and libertarianism is constantly discussed in the media. It’s nothing less than a sea change — a true rEVOLution.

Sure, I wish things were moving even faster. But the logic of our ideas is winning us converts daily, while the Big Government left and right are increasingly seen as bankrupt.

But liberty is NOT inevitable. Our ideas are fighting other powerful ideas and movements in the marketplace of ideas. There’s no guarantee those ideas won’t defeat our own. Their proponents are certainty trying hard to make that happen. Have you noticed the many attacks on libertarianism recently, by scholars, journalists, pundits, politicians, and other influential people?

A major reason libertarianism has seen such great success in recent years is because untold thousands of people have worked so hard, and contributed so much, to bring us to this point.

You yourself learned about liberty from someone. Maybe someone gave you a copy of the #libertyWorld’s Smallest Political Quiz.

Maybe you heard a libertarian candidate or speaker on television or radio.

Maybe you read a book or article written by a libertarian writer.

However you learned about libertarianism, it was because someone, in some way, reached out to you. That person, too, learned from someone else.

And that outreach was backed up by a network of libertarian organizations that have worked for decades to create a powerful movement ready with information and opportunities for people who want to make a difference in the world.

Those organizations didn’t spring up out of the ground by magic. They were only possible because someone — someone like you — years ago decided that this cause was so important they wanted to make sure these organizations existed, so that people like you could learn about liberty and the liberty movement.

For almost thirty years the Advocates has been a vital part of the libertarian movement. Our mission is a unique one. We help people encounter and learn about the ideas of liberty — and we provide them with the best methods and tools to help them, in turn, take those ideas to others.

The Advocates has helped millions of people encounter, evaluate and embrace the ideas of liberty. And we’ve helped countless libertarians become highly successful in convincing others to accept these ideas.

Our World’s Smallest Political Quiz has been taken online over 22 million times. Thousands of people take it each month, learning more about their political views and discovering libertarianism.

The Quiz has reached additional millions through newspapers, magazines, OPH booths, over 10 million card copies, textbooks, talk radio, and many other ways.

The Liberator Online — you’re reading it right now — takes information about liberty, the liberty movement, and the best ways to communicate libertarian ideas to over 30,000 subscribers.

We reach out in many other ways, too. New technology offers incredible opportunities. I recently did an online communication seminar from my office in Georgia with a group of libertarian students in Arizona. That would have been inconceivable just a few years ago.

But it still comes down to you. You — your activism, your donations, your outreach to friends, neighbors, families and others — make the work of the Advocates, and the growth of the liberty movement, possible.

Your participation is vital. The future of liberty — for yourself, your family, the world — will be shaped by the actions of the libertarians of today.

This is incredibly important. Liberty matters. The lives and well-being of millions of people are at stake.

Your efforts make a difference. Your participation in the struggle is essential.

As the great libertarian economist Ludwig von Mises said:

“No one can find a safe way out for himself if society is sweeping towards destruction. Therefore everyone, in his own interests, must thrust himself vigorously into the intellectual battle. None can stand aside with unconcern; the interests of everyone hang on the result.”

Victory is NOT inevitable. But our ideas are moving forward, and there is great reason for optimism.

When you contribute to the work of the Advocates — or other worthy libertarian organizations — you are helping move the world in the right direction. You are making a real difference.

DonateJust as someone, once, did for you.

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Discovery BEFORE Persuasion

in Communicating Liberty, Liberator Online Archives by Michael Cloud Comments are off

(From the Persuasion Power Point section in Volume 19, No. 15 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

What’s the fastest and easiest way to bring people into the libertarian movement?  

“Help some of them see that they are already libertarians,” says Perry Willis, former Executive Director of the National Libertarian Party and current vice president of Downsize DC.

“Discovery before persuasion. Before you try to persuade NON-libertarians to become libertarians, first look for and talk with people who are already libertarians — or mostly libertarian.”

Such people are out there — by the tens of millions. Last year, a Freedomworks poll found that fully “78 percent of Republicans and GOP-leaning independents self-identify as fiscally conservative and socially moderate.”

Further: “Told that libertarians generally believe individuals should be free to do as they like as long as they don’t hurt others and that the government should keep out of people’s day-to-day lives, 58 percent of the full national sample said they agree.”

Such people are obviously sympathetic to libertarian ideas — but millions of them don’t know about libertarianism. The Freedomworks poll found that about 40 percent of 18-to-32-year-olds view the word “libertarian” favorably — but about a third didn’t know what it meant.

They are waiting to hear about libertarianism. How do you quickly discover these libertarian-leaning people?

A great way is by using the Advocates’ World’s Smallest Political Quiz. Available as a pocket-sized card or in its famous online version, it’s the quickest and easiest way to identify someone’s political leanings. To do this in large groups, use OPH (Operation Politically Homeless), which incorporates the Quiz into a crowd-drawing fun booth that identifies and recruits new supporters.

Perry Willis’s “discovery before persuasion” rule focuses us on those who are most receptive and responsive to libertarianism.

People who are glad to hear about liberty. Who are delighted to learn that they aren’t the only ones who believe what they believe and want what they want: freedom.

Warning: Mr. Willis is NOT saying “discovery INSTEAD OF persuasion.” He is saying “FIRST discovery, THEN persuasion.”

“Discovery before persuasion” is easy, enjoyable, fast, and effective.

For us and for those we speak with.

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* * * * * * * *
Unlocking More Secrets of Libertarian PersuasionMichael Cloud’s latest book Unlocking More Secrets of Libertarian Persuasion is available exclusively from the Advocates, along with his acclaimed earlier book Secrets of Libertarian Persuasion.In 2000, Michael was honored with the Thomas Paine Award as the Most Persuasive Libertarian Communicator in America.

Tip: Make Your OPH Booth a “Politically Homeless Shelter”

in Communicating Liberty, Liberator Online Archives by Sharon Harris Comments are off

(From the One-Minute Liberty Tip section in Volume 19, No. 11 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

I’m always on the lookout for ways to make OPH even more fun and successful than it already is. Politically Homeless Shelter

(OPH is, of course, Operation Politically Homeless — the Advocates’ acclaimed “event in a kit,” which uses the World’s Smallest Political Quiz and other tools to transform an ordinary dull ho-hum outreach booth into a crowd-drawing, fun event.)

Danny Bedwell — Libertarian Party candidate for U.S. Congress and former Chair of the Libertarian Party of Mississippi — has a neat tip I’m pleased to share with you.

On hot summer days, make your OPH booth even more attractive to passers-by: turn it into a “Politically Homeless SHELTER.”

The idea is simple, clever and easy. Just put those words — “Politically Homeless Shelter” — on a sign near your OPH booth, and prominently show that you have free iced water or soft drinks, snacks, and perhaps a shady place to pause and rest a moment.

If you’re doing OPH outside on a hot day — at a fair, festival, concert, rally or other event — this is an easy way to make your OPH booth even more popular.

When your guests take the World’s Smallest Political Quiz, they will discover where they fit on the political map. You’ll be turning the “politically homeless” into people who have a true political home!  And you’ll discover lots of people who are thirsty for liberty (as well as that cold drink).

Thanks, Danny!

Learn more about OPH here.

Students: We’re giving free OPH kits to student liberty groups! Learn morehere.

Daily Beast: World’s Smallest Political Quiz and OPH Recruiting New Libertarians at CPAC

in Communicating Liberty, Economic Liberty, Liberator Online Archives, Personal Liberty by Sharon Harris Comments are off

(From the President’s Corner section in Volume 19, No. 5 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

Guess which booth at this year’s widely-covered CPAC drew the biggest, mostexcited crowds?

(CPAC — the Conservative Political Action Committee — is the nation’s largest annual gathering of conservative activists and office holders, with a strong number of libertarian students among the attendees.)

Here’s what The Daily Beast — one of the most influential news sites on the web, read by millions of readers each month – reported:

“Of all the booths, the one consistently drawing the biggest crowds was WarOnYouth, a joint project by Generation Opportunity and Young Americans for Liberty (YAL)…

“As a clever gimmick, YAL was having passers-by fill out a quickie quiz to determine where they fell on an ideological quadrant that included not just a left/right divide, but also a libertarian/statist one.

 “According to the results chart, the vast majority of respondents fell into the libertarian range, represented by — surprise! — Ron and Rand Paul.”

Yes, that’s Operation Politically Homeless (OPH) and the World’s Smallest Political Quiz working their magic on the CPAC crowd!

Once again the incredible effectiveness of the Advocates’ Operation Politically Homeless booth was demonstrated. Once again OPH has been used to reach the minds of the political leaders, activists and donors of tomorrow.

From the very first time the Advocates introduced OPH, some 25 years ago, users have told us over and over again that OPH brings their outreach booth and tabling efforts alive.

OPH consistently makes a booth the most active, the most talked about, the most fascinating, at any event. OPH consistently draws the biggest crowds, the greatest attention. It is fun and fascinating — for boothers and attendees alike.

And OPH opens minds and changes lives.

I strongly believe OPH, and the World’s Smallest Political Quiz that is the heart of OPH, has played a major role in opening up America’s political landscape to include libertarians.

Prior to the introduction of the World’s Smallest Political Quiz, most Americans thought of politics using a simplistic model of left versus right — which excludes libertarians.

But for over 25 years the Quiz has opened tens of millions of minds to a better political map — one that includes libertarians.

The CPAC OPH booth is just the latest example of the crowd-drawing, mind-opening power of this remarkable tool.

Ron Paul observed the power of the Quiz and OPH many years ago, and put it very well: “The World’s Smallest Political Quiz is responsible for many Americans’ first contact with libertarian ideas. While traveling around the country, I have often heard people say, ‘I never knew I was a libertarian until I took the Quiz!’”

Over 1,000 OPH Kits Delivered FREE to Campus Libertarian Groups

More good news: I am pleased to announce a new OPH milestone.

In the past few years the Advocates has given — completely free of charge — over 1,000 OPH booths to libertarian campus organizations across America.

These kits have reached tens of thousands of students with the ideas of liberty, and they will continue to do so for years. (Student groups: learn more about OPH — and how you can get your FREE OPH kit if you haven’t already — here.)

These OPH kits are being used by libertarian campus groups to discover libertarian-leaning students and welcome them to the liberty movement. Libertarian campus organizations are using OPH to sign up new members and supporters — new libertarian activists who will work in college and after graduation to bring liberty to all America.

And that’s great news indeed!

World’s Smallest Political Quiz Taken 21 Million Times Online

in Liberator Online Archives by Sharon Harris Comments are off

Great news!

QuizAs of this week, the online World’s Smallest Political Quiz has now been taken more than 21 MILLION TIMES since we first put it on the Web in 1995.

Regular readers will remember we celebrated the 20-million milestone just a few months ago, in late October. So we’re delighted that in the four months since then, the Quiz has been taken an additional million times, reaching so many more people with the mind-changing idea of a new political map — one that includes libertarianism!

The Quiz has become an Internet legend — the world’s first, and by far most popular, Internet political quiz.

And the numbers don’t stop there. We’ve distributed over 12 million Quiz cards. Millions more people have encountered the Quiz in classrooms, major textbooks, newspapers, books, on talk radio, at Facebook, at Operation Politically Homeless (OPH) booths, and elsewhere.

This is fantastic news for libertarians. Because the Quiz is arguably the most effective tool for libertarian understanding and outreach ever invented.

When people take the Quiz:

* They learn that libertarianism is a major part of the American political spectrum — that there is more to politics than just left versus right.

* They get insights into their own political views, and they think about some of today’s most important — but often ignored — political issues.

* They learn that, on many key issues, libertarians are their allies, even if they consider themselves liberals or conservatives or centrists.

* A large percentage of Quiz takers discover they are libertarians, or have more in common with libertarianism than any other political philosophy.

* At our website, Quiz takers are given instant access to outstanding information about libertarian ideas. Their questions are answered. They are given the opportunity to become active in the libertarian movement. And they are offered tools and training to help them become ever more effective and successful in their libertarian outreach.

Please note: the amazing success of the Quiz is no accident. The Advocates has spent many years developing, refining and promoting the Quiz.

The World’s Smallest Political Quiz was created by Advocates Founder Marshall Fritz in 1987. It was built on a revolutionary multi-spectrum political chart created in 1970 by David F. Nolan (a co-founder of the Libertarian Party). Fritz added ten short questions and a graph to Nolan’s chart. The questions and graph allowed people to quickly plot their place on the political spectrum, as well as giving other political insights.

From the beginning, Marshall insisted that the Quiz be not just fast and fun, but above all honest and accurate — giving reliable and useful insights to those who take it.

The result is a tool so effective and mind-opening that non-libertarian educators, journalists and others can — and do — use it and recommend it.

During the past decade, the Quiz has been featured in many of America’s best selling college and high school textbooks or their supplementary material, including more than a dozen key textbooks by the biggest names in publishing. And we’ve supplied educators, at their request, with tens of thousands of card Quizzes for their classrooms. (Are you a teacher, professor, or other education professional? Email me for information on free Quizzes for your students, or fill out the request form at the bottom of this page.)

This is tangible, real-world outreach success. And it is making a real difference.

As Ron Paul has said: “The World’s Smallest Political Quiz is responsible for many Americans’ first contact with libertarian ideas. While traveling around the country, I have often heard people say, ‘I never knew I was a libertarian until I took the Quiz!’”

The success of the Quiz is great news for the entire liberty movement. We’re finding and educating the libertarian leaders, activists and supporters of tomorrow!

NONE of this success would have been possible without the help of the many wonderful people who support the work of the Advocates with their generous donations.

If you would like to join them by becoming an Advocates donor, we have some fantastic “thank you” gifts for you. Check them out here. Or call us toll-free at (800) 983-1776.

Thank you! Now, on to the NEXT million!

Do You Prefer Cats, Dogs — Or Liberty?

in Liberator Online Archives by Sharon Harris Comments are off

(From the President’s Corner section in Volume 19, No. 2 of the Liberator Online. Subscribe here!)

As president of the organization that publishes the world’s first and most popular online political Quiz, I was naturally interested when TIME magazine posted an online political quiz this month in an article entitled “Your Personality Makes Your Politics.”

“Can TIME Predict Your Politics?” the article’s subhead asked.

Alas, for me — and, I suspect, many other readers — the answer was a resounding NO.

I took their quiz, and TIME’s description of my political views was wildly out of synch with what I believe. Not even remotely close. And I found some of the questions downright bewildering.

There are several reasons for this, which I’ll discuss in a moment.

But the main reason TIME got my position so very, very wrong is that my political view — libertarian — was not one of the possible answers.

Yes, that’s right. TIME’s quiz attempts to shoehorn every taker’s politics as some variant of liberal, conservative, or moderate.

TIME’s quiz uses the simplistic, inaccurate, discriminatory, discredited left-versus-right view of politics — which leaves out libertarians entirely.

And there’s simply no excuse for that.

Numerous recent surveys indicate that 15%-20% or more of Americans are more libertarian than either liberal or conservative. The 2012 Cato Institute book The Libertarian Vote: Swing Voters, Tea Parties, and the Fiscally Conservative, Socially Liberal Center explores these results at length, and concludes that 10 to 20 percent of Americans are fiscally conservative and socially liberal-libertarian.

In August 2000 the Rasmussen polling firm gave the Advocates’ World’s Smallest Political Quiz to nearly 1,000 representative American voters. Our Quiz is a far more rigorous test of one’s libertarian leanings than the looser definitions typically used by polling firms. Yet fully sixteen percent scored in the libertarian sector then — a figure roughly identical to Cato’s estimate.

And the numbers are growing fast. An August poll by FreedomWorks found that fully “78 percent of Republicans and GOP-leaning independents self-identify as fiscally conservative and socially moderate.” Further: “Told that libertarians generally believe individuals should be free to do as they like as long as they don’t hurt others and that the government should keep out of people’s day-to-day lives, 58 percent of the full national sample said they agree.”

Any attempt to identify American’s political leanings that leaves out many of these millions of libertarians and libertarian-leaners is thus doomed to fail.

The inadequacies of the left-versus-right model of politics was the main reason David Nolan created his now-famous Nolan Chart back in 1971, the graphic foundation of the Advocates’ World’s Smallest Political Quiz.

By showing that there was more to politics than just left versus right, our Quiz has opened millions of minds to a more inclusive, more insightful political map.

This accuracy is one reason the Quiz rapidly became the world’s most popular political quiz. It’s been taken over 20 million times online. It’s been recommended by numerous major high school and college textbooks and is used in classrooms across America. It’s been translated into several languages and reprinted in newspapers and magazines with total circulations in the many millions.

All of this is because it works. Because it provides honest, essential, enlightening insights into politics. Because it realizes that no discussion of modern American politics makes sense without including the distinctive libertarian view (and its mirror-opposite, statism).

But back to the TIME quiz.

I have a lot of respect for the researcher behind TIME’s quiz. Jonathan Haidt is the author of the outstanding 2012 book The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion, which is carefully researched and rich in political insights. I recommend it.

That book shows Haidt has a solid understanding of libertarianism and, more than that, an appreciation of what libertarians believe. And I’m a strong proponent of Haidt’s goal of fostering more productive political discussions through a greater understanding of different viewpoints.

TIME’s quiz isn’t a traditional political quiz. It tries to identify your politics based on a number of seemingly non-political questions that have been found to correlate with a person’s political leanings. The first question, for instance is, “Do you prefer cats or dogs?”

This is an interesting line of research, but since libertarians apparently aren’t included in this — and since the overriding value of libertarians is political liberty across the board, trumping cultural or lifestyle matters — I would think it would be hard to identify libertarians in such a way (though I could be wrong). Perhaps the quiz’s lack of a libertarian score indicates this.

A few of the questions also suffer from ambiguity in wording, something libertarians are especially sensitive to. Like “Respect for authority is something all children need to learn.” What KIND of authority? Political? Family? School? Religion? Tell us more! For libertarians, the key political question is always: Is force being initiated?

By the way, Haidt himself acknowledges the problems with the left-right line. In the introduction to his TIME quiz, he notes: “many people can’t place themselves along the liberal-conservative dimension — such as libertarians, or people who find wisdom on both sides on different issues.” The results, he says, is that the TIME quiz has “moderate predictive power.”

Given this, TIME’s Quiz — like all efforts at political measurement based on the hopelessly inadequate left-versus-right model — is doomed to not work for millions of us — or to produce less than satisfying results overall.

Back to the drawing board, TIME! Meanwhile, why not offer the World’s Smallest Political Quiz to your readers — as the Washington Post, London Sunday Times, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Miami Herald and many other outstanding publications have done?

The Original Internet Quiz Gets a New Home

in News From the Advocates for Self-Government by Advocates HQ Comments are off

The Advocates for Self-Government is pleased to launch its revamped website as a new hub for all libertarian activists and for anyone who would like to learn more about libertarianism.

The libertarian non-profit that created the world-famous World’s Smallest Political Quiz is launching www.TheAdvocates.org as a center for numerous new resources, including “Libertarian Answers,” a searchable database of carefully-crafted responses to questions libertarians face day-to-day; tools, tips and techniques for successful outreach; links to liberty movement organizations; and more.

The new website has been designed to help both experienced and new activists share the libertarian philosophy with friends, family and peers.

The centerpiece of the site will be the World’s Smallest Political Quiz, which is taken several thousand times per day and has so far been taken almost 20 million times online. The renowned Quiz has been featured in numerous books and newspapers, and it is used by educators in high school and college classrooms. It is also currently being used by students in hundreds of college libertarian organizations to help their fellow students better understand the American political spectrum.

The World’s Smallest Political Quiz is often a person’s introduction to libertarianism and to how libertarians differ from liberals and conservatives. The Quiz is based on the Nolan Chart, which measures political preferences on two axes — economic issues and personal issues. This new political map more accurately reflects the diversity of U.S. political views than does the older but inadequate left-right line.

“The Quiz makes it possible for people to quickly and easily discover where they truly fit in the world of politics,” said Sharon Harris, President of the Advocates for Self-Government. “Our new website will also showcase the many Advocates programs that teach libertarians how to successfully communicate the ideas of liberty.”

Rupert Boneham, star of the popular TV show “Survivor” and 2012 Indiana gubernatorial candidate, said the Quiz first introduced him to the political philosophy which best fits his beliefs and values.

“I am a proud libertarian. It took most of my life to figure out that I had been living and teaching the libertarian philosophy for years,” Boneham said. “It was when I first took the World’s Smallest Political Quiz that I discovered there was a political party and philosophy that I truly aligned with.”

The Advocates for Self-Government is a nonprofit libertarian educational organization that has been working for the libertarian ideals of individual liberty, free markets, and peace since 1985.

A Libertarian Dozen of the Best Ways to Discover and Create More Libertarians

in Communicating Liberty by Sharon Harris Comments are off

You’ve heard of a “baker’s dozen,” which is 13 instead of 12. Since libertarians always deliver more for the buck, here are 19 tips and techniques you can put to use immediately to discover and create more libertarians!

Enjoy these tips – and put them to use for liberty. Please let me know about your successes! Thank you!

1. Be aware of the “curse of knowledge.”

When you know a lot about something, it can be frustrating trying to explain it to someone who doesn’t have the knowledge you have. It can also be frustrating to your listener. Remember, it took you time to learn about all these ideas, so be patient. And don’t try to talk about too much at a time.

Always treat your listener like YOU would like to be treated.

2. The First Rule of Libertarian Communication?

This may be The First Rule of Libertarian Communication: Don’t turn people off to libertarianism. Don’t ruin a potential recruit. Don’t leave him or her with a distaste for libertarians and libertarianism.

It usually takes people several exposures to a new idea before they are willing to seriously consider it and embrace it. (In fact, if they adopt it too quickly, without reflection, they may abandon it just as quickly when the next new idea comes along.)

So when you meet people new to libertarianism, it’s not your job to convert them in one session. Though it could happen, it probably won’t. Resist the temptation to browbeat them, to argue, to grab them by the lapels and convince them of every detail of your views. (I know, it’s hard to resist sometimes! But try.)

Your goal as a libertarian communicator in most of these situations is simply to make a good impression and provide some useful and intriguing information. Smile. Listen to their concerns. Offer some good ideas. Find what issues are important to your listeners, and agree with them whenever you honestly can. Show them you’re a good person who shares their concerns (remember the Ransberger Pivot). Leave them with a few of those pocket-sized copies of the World’s Smallest Political Quiz that you always carry with you. (Quiz cards are designed so each is a self-contained outreach kit, and they’re available online from the Advocates Liberty Store.

Then, the next time this person encounters libertarian ideas — in a letter to the editor, on TV or radio, or in person — he will remember his first encounter pleasantly, and will be better prepared to explore these ideas further.

You want him to think along these lines: “That libertarian guy I met last month was pleasant and interesting, and his ideas were intriguing. I agreed with a lot of what he had to say. And now here’s another good idea from a libertarian. I need to look more deeply into libertarianism.”

This may sound like a simple tip. But believe me: it is crucial. When you identify yourself to someone as a libertarian, you instantly become, for that person, the public face of the whole libertarian movement.

Many, many people have been permanently turned off to libertarian ideas simply because the first libertarian they encountered acted in a way they found offensive, or presented the ideas in ways they found objectionable or obnoxious. And that’s a tragedy.

First, Do No Harm. That’s great advice for doctors – and libertarian communicators, too.

Instead of an argument

Alas, some libertarians consider arguing their favorite sport. It certainly can be fun, but often it is self-defeating.

Next time you find yourself tempted to argue, put yourself in the other person’s shoes: how many times have YOU changed your mind about something because someone attacked your position or told you your ideas were stupid?

Libertarian humorist Dave Barry says about himself (hopefully he’s joking!): “I argue very well. Ask any of my remaining friends. I can win an argument on any topic, against any opponent. People know this, and steer clear of me at parties. Often – as a sign of their great respect – they don’t even invite me.” Ouch!

Productive alternatives to arguing include: actually listening to the other person, developing rapport, asking questions to discover his or her concerns, finding common ground, and sharing stories of how free-market alternatives have solved problems in the past.

These techniques and many more are described in detail in past “Liberty Minute” columns, in the Liberator Online‘s “Persuasion Power Points” columns, in Michael Cloud’s book Secrets of Libertarian Persuasion, in Cloud’s audio program Essence of Libertarian Persuasion, and at the Advocates’ Communication Center.

Arguing is the Little League of communication. Persuasion is the World Series. It takes longer to master, but it’s a far better game and the pay-off is well worth it.

Don’t Begin with an Apology

Suppose you had a really nice house you wanted to sell. When a prospective buyer came by, would your opening line be, “You may have heard about houses like this falling down, but that’s not true about this house.”

If you owned a restaurant, would you advertise, “Our burgers aren’t the kind that make people sick – honest!”

Of course you wouldn’t. But that’s exactly what I’ve heard many libertarians do when they’re introducing others to libertarian ideas.

They begin with, “There are lots of misconceptions about libertarianism.” Or, “I know you’ve heard that libertarians don’t care about the poor, but I’m not like that.” Or, “Despite what you may have heard, it’s not true that Lyndon LaRouche is a libertarian.”

While it’s important to correct misunderstandings and falsehoods about libertarianism (when they come up), it’s even more important to start your discussion of libertarianism in a positive way.

Opening with a negative or apologetic statement immediately plants seeds of doubt in the mind of your listeners. Most people believe that, where there’s smoke, there’s quite possibly a fire.

It also invites attack and argument, since you start by putting yourself on the defensive.

But most importantly, many people – if not most – have a very positive overall impression of libertarianism. It’s self-defeating to begin by apologizing for some misconception or falsehood they may not even be concerned about.

Once you’ve given them an honest, positive description of libertarianism they’ll be able to clearly see the benefits of liberty. And if they hear negative things about libertarianism, or have concerns, they can ask you – or, even better, they’ll correct the misconceptions themselves!

3. A “Good Neighbor Policy” for Libertarians

One of the best ways to win others to libertarian ideas is simply to be a nice person – a nice person who also happens to be a libertarian.

This is one of the things that the late, great Karl Hess – one of the most influential libertarians of the past century – often talked about: the importance of being a “good neighbor.” In his West Virginia rural community, Hess pitched in and helped his neighbors build barns and do other chores. As a result, they liked this friendly, helpful neighbor – and they respected his out-of-mainstream libertarian ideas.

Libertarian philosopher Tibor Machan puts another spin on the same notion: “People tend to be more interested in what you have to say if they already know what kind of wine you like.”

It’s common knowledge that people will be more likely to try a new product, or a new idea, if someone they know and respect suggests it. That’s as true of political ideas as it is of restaurants or jogging shoes.

So one of the best ways to help people become open to our ideas is to first let them get to know you as friendly, nice, interesting, interested, and helpful. Then, when they find out you are also a libertarian, they’ll be interested in learning more. The ideas will be “vetted” because they already respect you.

Yes, it’s simple, it seems obvious – but how many of us practice this as often as we might? Be a good friend, relative, neighbor, co-worker – and your ideas will carry far more weight.

4. Listen. Listen. Listen.

One of the most important – and frequently overlooked, and surprisingly difficult – secrets of truly successful communication is LISTENING.

In our eagerness to tell people about the ideas of liberty, we may miss out on the big benefits of simply stopping and listening.

Here are some of those benefits:

1. You learn what the other person’s primary concerns and interests are. This gives you a chance to address those concerns, instead of talking about something the other person doesn’t care about.

2. You find out about any misconceptions they may have about libertarianism. This gives you a chance to clear those up.

3. You can discover areas of agreement, thus creating invaluable rapport.

4. You show the other person that you are interested in them. People tend to be reciprocal, and therefore will be more interested in you.

To be a good listener, you must REALLY listen – not just pretend. Breathe and focus on what the other person is saying.

While this is SIMPLE, it’s certainly not EASY. (If you think it is… try it.) But trust me, this is powerful.

So be sure to listen up! The benefits make it well worth the effort.

* * *

In a recent Dilbert cartoon, the obnoxious Dogbert character told a communication seminar: “There’s really no point in listening to other people. They’re either going to be agreeing with you or saying stupid stuff.”

Thank goodness Dogbert isn’t a libertarian! The fact is, every successful persuasion conversation starts with listening. Attentive listening assures the other person that you care about what they think, and allows you to effectively address their concerns.

But how do you know you’re really hearing what they’re saying? It’s simple: Repeat what the other person said. Then ask: “Is that right?” This technique is called “echoing.” It lets someone know you heard and understood.

Example: They say, “In a libertarian society, wouldn’t poor people starve without government welfare?” You say, “You’re concerned that poor people wouldn’t get the help they need in a libertarian society, and would starve. Is that correct?”

Wait for the response (and listen to it!). Then you can talk about how liberty helps the poor. Echoing lets the other person know you’re listening. It’s a technique that builds the respect and rapport that’s necessary to change somebody’s mind.

Is there an exception to this rule? Only one: Don’t listen to Dogbert!

5. Learn about sales and learn about psychology.

[Info to follow. Please check back soon.]

6. K.I.S.S. (Keep it short, silly).

Few people like to hear a lecture from another person, so keep your answers short. Here are some good tips on doing this.

Success with Soundbites

As a libertarian, you are automatically a spokesperson for libertarianism. How well you answer questions about liberty may well determine whether or not your listeners decide to become libertarians.

So you should always be prepared to answer, in a quick, clear and memorable way, common questions about libertarianism.

Take a lesson from some of the world’s best communicators: don’t leave it to chance!

Don’t hope that inspiration will strike you at the moment you’re unexpectedly asked a question. Don’t risk the frustration of stumbling around, answering badly, and then kicking yourself a day or two later when the right answer suddenly pops into your head.

Instead, work on your answers in advance. Create soundbites – short, pithy, memorable answers – to those questions.

You can probably make a list of questions you are most likely to be asked about libertarianism. (The most common: “What is libertarianism, anyway?”)

For each of those questions, create one or more soundbites. They should be about thirty seconds long. Less is better. Write them down. Refine them. Commit them to memory. And practice saying them until they come quickly and easily, and sound natural and fresh.

Former Libertarian Party presidential candidates Ed Clark, David Bergland, and Harry Browne each did this. The seemingly off-the-cuff eloquence they showed during their campaigns was actually the result of their advance work preparing and practicing soundbites.

Happily, you don’t have to reinvent the soundbite wheel. The Advocates collected the best of Harry Browne’s campaign soundbites into his wonderful book Liberty A to Z: 872 Libertarian Soundbites You Can Use Right Now. Dr. Mary Ruwart is a pioneer in the creation of soundbites. Many answers from her “Ask Dr. Ruwart” column are archived in searchable form at the Advocates Web site. Mary also has an outstanding book, Short Answers to the Tough Questions, a treasure of soundbites, available from the Advocates.

There are also some great short soundbite-sized answers to common questions at Libertarianism.com.

Take these sources as your starting point. Pick the soundbites you like. Personalize them. Rewrite them and make them your own. Learn them.

You’ll be a far more comfortable and polished spokesperson for liberty. And you’ll enjoy your casual conversations about libertarianism a lot more.

“Hey, What’s a Libertarian?”

One day, you’re going to be asked: “Just what is a libertarian, anyway?”

It may happen while you’re calling into a talk radio show. “So tell us,”, the host may ask you. “What do libertarians believe, anyway?”

Or you may be running for office and a reporter gives you the opportunity to “define yourself” for his story.

Your answer could be very important. It might reach thousands. Or it might reach just one person who is very important to you.

Don’t hope for inspiration. Instead, be prepared.

Have a clear, short, persuasive and easy-to-understand definition on the tip of your tongue.

I strongly suggest you *memorize* your favorite definition – and practice delivering it – so you don’t have to even think about it when asked.

That’s what two of America’s most successful libertarian communicators — presidential candidates Harry Browne and David Bergland – both told me they did.

You can write your own definition. You can also use someone else’s, or modify someone else’s to fit your own style.

Here are some definitions to try on for size:

The American Heritage Dictionary: “One who advocates maximizing individual rights and minimizing the role of the state

Here’s what I usually say: “Libertarianism is, as the name implies, the belief in liberty. Libertarians believe that you own your own life and property, and you have the right to make your own choices as to how you live your life — as long as you simply respect the same right of others to do the same. We believe in individual liberty and limited government.”

And here’s a great one from David Bergland: “Libertarianism is what you probably already believe. Libertarian values are American values. Libertarianism is America’s heritage of liberty, patriotism and honest work to build a future for your family. It’s the idea that being free and independent is a great way to live. That each of us is a unique individual, with great potential. That you own yourself, and that you have the right to decide what’s best for you. Americans of all races and creeds built a great and prosperous country with these libertarian ideals. Let’s use them to build America’s future.”

Find more great short definitions.

Speaking of our libertarianism.com site, keep that URL in mind! It’s very useful to be able to add, after your definition: “If you want to learn more about libertarianism, there’s a Web site that can answer your questions: www.Libertarianism.com .”

7. Importance of branding libertarianism.

McDonald’s doesn’t sell hamburgers. It sells Big Macs. Coca-Cola doesn’t sell cola drinks. It sells Cokes.

These companies want you to think of *their* stores and *their* products when you are ready to buy. And they want you to come back. Again and again.

For the same reason, when you are talking or writing about libertarian ideas, use the words “libertarian” or “libertarianism.”

This accomplishes two vital things.

1) It helps people become aware of those words. It helps them understand that libertarianism is a distinctive political philosophy – a political “brand.”

2) Unless you brand your idea as libertarian, your letter to the editor or your conversation may become an “ad” for conservatism or liberalism instead of libertarianism.

For example, a letter to the editor against gun control that fails to mention the word “libertarian” will, by default, be seen by virtually all readers as a conservative letter. Similarly, a speech opposing the War on Drugs will be understood by many listeners to be a liberal speech – unless the word “libertarian” is used in it.

When you get hungry for a burger, McDonald’s wants you to think of them. When people get hungry for solutions to political problems, we want them to think of libertarians. A letter or conversation that brands solutions as “libertarian” will send customers to the libertarian “store” – where they can sample our other “products,” that is, other libertarian positions and the libertarian ideology.

Unless you brand your ideas as libertarian, people will miss the opportunity to learn about our movement that is devoted to liberty on every issue – and to become a part of it!

8. Using questions.

The Power of Questions

Libertarians have lots of great answers to political questions.

Sometimes, however, it’s better to ask questions instead of giving answers. Asking the right question, or asking a question in the right way, can stimulate mind-opening insights.

Here’s one example of a great question, from Wall Street Journal editor John Fund.

Suppose someone is talking about the need for a major government role in providing for the poor. Instead of lecturing the person (which could start an argument and put the person on the defensive), try asking this question:

“Imagine you won the lottery or otherwise came into a large sum of money, and you wanted to help the poor. You could give $100,000 to a private charity of your choice. Or you could write your check to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Which would you choose – and why?”

Virtually no one chooses government! And in answering the question, people convince themselves of the advantages of charity over government.

Questions make people think. It’s amazing how often people will come up with the libertarian answer to a problem, if you give them a chance. And if they do so, they are more likely to accept that answer.

Flipping the Question

In this issue, we have excerpts from a new TIME magazine interview with Ron Paul.

One of the questions TIME asked Paul was this:

“Why do you support the decriminalization of marijuana?”

Now that sounds like a perfectly normal, fair and innocent question. And, in fact, it is.

But think about the wording. The question creates a “frame” in a listener’s mind. Asked in this way, the question implies, and assumes, and implicitly announces, that the position being questioned is unusual, out-of-mainstream, radical, weird, or even dangerous.

The result: No matter how you answer it, that initial impression remains. And you sound out-of-mainstream, on the fringe, or worse.

Please note: I’m not saying that someone who asks a question worded like that is trying to paint you in a negative manner. They may, in fact, agree 100% with you. But the wording of the question puts you at a major communication disadvantage, and undercuts your answer no matter how brilliant and logical it might be.

But you can reverse that, and turn it to your advantage – by using a technique I call “Flipping the Question,” or, for short, the Flip.

The Flip restates and reverses the question. When that happens, YOUR point becomes the reasonable, moderate, normal, safe view. Just like that! And the Flip is so subtle and effective that your questioner is likely to agree with you.

Ron Paul’s response to that TIME question is the perfect Flip.

He answered: “Why support the criminalization of marijuana is the better question.”

He then went on to give a strong, short argument for legalization of marijuana.

See what he did? He simply restated the question. Supporting marijuana prohibition was presented as the odd position. His position was presented as the normal, moderate, responsible, commonsense one.

It happened instantly.

You can use the Flip to great advantage in many libertarian conversations. Examples:

QUESTION: Why do you want to end government schools?

FLIP: A better question would be, “After so many decades of failure, why does anyone still think the government is competent to educate our children?”

QUESTION: Why do you defend gun ownership so strongly?

FLIP: A better question might be, “Why would anyone want to deprive people of the ability to defend themselves and their loved ones from vicious criminals?”

When you Flip the Question, you, in essence, become the questioner. The original questioner (or the implicit assumption in the question) is suddenly put on the defensive.

Note, too, that the Flip isn’t necessarily a rebuttal or an argument. Many questions worded this way aren’t coming from people hostile to your views. You will find that the Flip persuades many of these people to agree with you.

Flipping the Question is not something that comes naturally. You have to memorize the response, practice it, get comfortable and fluid with it. And of course you must have good answers about the subject being discussed.

But it is worth the effort. Because the Flip can turn your answer into a victory for your ideas.

9. Take YES for an answer.

As libertarians, we’re always anxious to persuade others to come around to our point of view about every issue.

So in our first conversation with someone, it’s easy to fall into the trap of not taking YES for an answer.

All too often we anxiously wait for – or even rush the conversation toward – a hot-button topic on which we *disagree* with the person, so we can begin the persuasion process!

But when we do this, we skip one very important step in a discussion: building rapport. Without rapport, persuasion is very difficult, if not impossible.

One wonderful thing about libertarianism is that EVERYONE agrees with us on some – even many – issues. So try starting the conversation with areas of agreement. Linger on those issues, enjoy the conversation, and let the other person know how smart you think they are! Be sure to tell them that you – and other libertarians – strongly agree with them on those issues.

Hold off on steering the conversation toward disagreement until later in the conversation – or even until a future conversation.

Learn to take YES for an answer, first, and you’ll find it much easier to get to agreement on those controversial topics.

10. Use the Ransberger Pivot.

Ouch! Libertarians sometimes get hit with hostile questions from people who don’t understand the ideas of liberty and free markets.

Mention free markets, ending the War on Drugs, or replacing government schools with private alternatives, for example, and some people will go ballistic. They will think you’re crazy, or have evil intentions, or both – and they’ll let you know it.

“End government welfare? Do you hate the poor?”

“Make drugs legal? Do you want our streets filled with crazed addicts and criminals?”

“No government schools? Do you want a nation of illiterates? Don’t you care about our children?”

Sound familiar? It’s easy for a conversation to quickly degenerate from here into a shouting match, or a meaningless exchange of slogans and rhetoric.

But there’s a far better way to respond. Use the Ransberger Pivot!

The Ransberger Pivot is one of the most effective communication tools I know. Invented in 1982 by Ray Ransberger and Advocates Founder Marshall Fritz, the Pivot is a great way to defuse hostility and get your questioner on *your* side.

The Ransberger Pivot is quite simple – but it doesn’t come naturally. It takes some practice. But the payoff makes it well worth the effort.

There are three steps to the Pivot:

Step 1: Stay calm and *listen* to what the questioner is asking.

Step 2: Ask yourself what the person is really concerned about. What does he really want? Make an intelligent guess.

Step 3: If you want the same thing (and 99% of the time you will), strongly express your desire for that same outcome. Show your questioner you share the same core values on this issue.

Let’s look at the Ransberger Pivot in action.

Your questioner asks: “You libertarians want to get rid of public schools, don’t you? What about our children?”

You ask yourself: What is this person *really* concerned about? What does he want?

Obviously, he wants children to be educated. A great goal! You want this, too, right?

So you respond something like this: “Like you, I too want to live in a world where all children are educated. In fact, where children have access to a far better education than they have now.”

Bingo! That’s the Pivot. You’ve bypassed a potential argument, and instead established a strong common ground with your questioner. Instead of immediately launching into a disagreement, you’ve found agreement and shared values.

Now you can go on to a constructive discussion of the best ways to achieve the end you both agree is worthwhile.

Of course, you then must have a good answer to that question. You need to know the facts – in this case, a persuasive case for why the private sector offers the best opportunity to dramatically improve education.

But The Ransberger Pivot is a vital transition, or prelude, to that answer. It plays a crucial role by defusing hostility, and thus making your questioner, and other listeners, more ready to hear your answer with an open mind.

Remember: when people ask hostile questions, they often are questioning your motives. They assume you disagree with their concerns, they think you have different values, and they may even believe you have bad intentions.

The Ransberger Pivot is a kind of verbal judo or aikido. It takes the steam out of the hostility by demonstrating that you share the questioner’s concerns. This in turn offers the opportunity for rapport. Your listeners are then more likely to pay attention to your answer, and you increase your chance of persuading them to your point of view.

Now that you know what the Ransberger Pivot is, let’s try it out.

Your questioner asks you: “You want to end welfare? What about the poor? Are you really that cold and heartless?”

Remember the Ransberger Pivot steps. Stay calm and don’t fall into a knee-jerk retort. Think: What’s the underlying concern here? Obviously, your questioner is against poverty, and wants to help those in need. That’s admirable, isn’t it? It’s actually a great ideal, and one you share.

So use the Ransberger Pivot to establish that common ground. Try a response along these lines:

“Like you, I am saddened and outraged by poverty. I want the poor and needy to have more aid, more effective aid, and far more opportunities than they do now. I want a world of abundance and opportunity for all people.”

Now, you can go on to have a fruitful discussion of the best way to achieve that goal. Again, you’ll need the facts for your argument. The Ransberger Pivot doesn’t give you that. But it does give you a more friendly, harmonious chance to convey those facts.

Some other Ransberger Pivot responses to typical questions:

“Like you, I want to live in a society where the streets are safe for our children…”

“Like you, I want clean air and water…”

“Like you, I want to know that the food and products I buy are safe…”

Here are a few more tips for using the Pivot.

1) It helps to memorize a specific phrase to kick it off. Notice above I used: “Like you, I want…” That’s a proven favorite. One advantage of memorizing an effective phrase like this is that it will always be there for you to use. Don’t rely on improvisation.

2) The Ransberger Pivot should be short. Just a sentence or two. It’s just a way to turn the discussion around. You need time for the follow-up answer, the meat of your discussion.

3) Use the first person (whenever it is appropriate). Instead of “libertarians want…” say “I want.” This more personal response helps establish rapport.

4) The Ransberger Pivot should only be used when you really agree with the listener’s concerns (and most of the time, you will). It’s the *opposite* of a trick or deception. It’s a way of clarification.

5) It takes practice! It is NOT as easy as it sounds. Using the Ransberger Pivot does not come naturally – especially when you’re in the midst of a discussion. So prepare now. Make a list of difficult questions. Ask them to yourself, or even better, get someone to ask them to you. Practice Ransberger Pivot responses until it becomes a reflex.

6) Start your soundbites with the Ransberger Pivot! In the past, I’ve discussed the importance of preparing and memorizing soundbite responses to the common questions every libertarian is inevitably asked. Use the Ransberger Pivot at the start of your soundbites, when appropriate. It’s a powerful combination!

Many libertarian communicators swear by the Ransberger Pivot. Give it a try!

11. Take NO for an answer.

Do you have someone with whom you’ve argued endlessly about politics and have never gotten an agreement?

Or is there someone in your life who gets mad (or gets quiet, or changes the subject) every time you bring up a political issue?

Suggestion: Unless you just enjoy arguing for the sake of arguing, don’t talk about politics with those individuals.

Unfortunately, not everyone is in the market for our ideas. Some people really believe in Big Government and limited individual liberty.

On the other hand, there are plenty of folks who are not only open to our ideas, but are eager to hear about them and take action! They’re HUNGRY for the solutions that liberty provides.

There’s a limited amount of time available to find and meet these people, share the ideas of liberty with them, and get them active in bringing libertarian ideas to still more people.

Ask any good salesman and he or she will tell you that the secret to making a sale is to talk to enough good prospects. To do that, we must learn to take “NO” for an answer, move on – and get a “YES!”

12. Do your homework.

13. Don’t hesitate to say “I don’t know.”

Are you an expert on politics, economics, world history, philosophy, geography, the environment, science, biology, current events, and half a dozen other major subjects?

Probably not. So, at some point in your conversations about liberty with friends, or in speeches about freedom to the public, you’re probably going to be asked a question you don’t know the answer to.

Be ready for it, because it happens to everyone. And relax – the answer is easy!

First, know what NOT to do. Don’t fall prey to the temptation to bluff your way through it or pretend to have knowledge you don’t have. This can really make you look bad.

Instead, first compliment the questioner: “That’s a very good question.” Then, just be honest: “And it’s one that I don’t know the answer to.”

How refreshing this will be to your audience! It’s not often that people encounter this kind of honesty – and they appreciate and respect it.

You now have the opportunity to let your audience know there is a large libertarian movement, where such questions have been discussed and answered. Tell them there are dozens of libertarian think tanks and organizations, and thousands of publications from libertarians on every conceivable topic – including this one. Let them know you will find the answer and get back to them right away.

If you don’t already have it, be sure to get contact information for the questioner and follow up promptly.

You’ve turned a difficult situation into an opportunity for further contact, and you’ve shown yourself to be human, honest, and reliable. Congratulations!

14. Have intellectual integrity.

15. Use “you” instead of “I.”

When talking about the benefits of liberty, we frequently use the word “I”. For example:

“Why should I have to give half of my income to the government?”

“Why should I have to pay for the education of other people’s children?”

“I would be far better off if I could invest the money that’s taken from me in Social Security taxes.”

By replacing “I” with “you,” we bring our listeners into the discussion. They are able to more clearly see that they — not just you — are victims of bad government policies. They can picture themselves benefiting from libertarian policies. And it sounds less selfish, less self-centered, as well.

“Why should you have to give half of your income to the government?”

“Why should you have to pay for the education of other people’s children?

“You would be far better off if you could invest the money that’s taken from you in Social Security taxes.”

A simple but effective shift in perspective. Try it!

16. Word choice: use the right words.

Mark Twain once siad the difference between the right word and the wrong word is the difference between “lightning” and “lightning bug.” I can’t stress too much how important it is to choose your words carefully.

[List to follow. Please check back soon.]

17. Be optimistic, passionate, enthusiastic.

18. Use the World’s Smallest Political Quiz and OPH.

19. Use the Libertarian Denominator.

Here is a great way to define libertarianism – particularly if someone asks you how libertarianism compares to liberalism and/or conservativism.

Libertarians often answer such questions with: “Libertarians are conservative on economic issues and liberal on social issues.”

Try using “The Libertarian Denominator” instead. Answer: “Conservatives who favor the free market tend to be libertarian on economic issues. Liberals who favor civil liberties tend to be libertarian on social issues.”

This answer makes libertarianism the common denominator – the measuring stick, if you will.

The Libertarian Denominator shows libertarianism to be the consistent philosophy, the one that favors liberty across the board.

An added bonus is instant rapport: just about everyone sees that they agree with libertarians – at least half the time!